Hospice Care Settings

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Continuous Care

Continuous Care is a level of Hospice initiated during a period of “crisis”.  A level in which the patient requires predominately nursing care for a minimum of 8 hours in a 24 hour day to achieve management of acute medical symptoms such as uncontrolled pain or breakdown of the caregiver system such that the patient will not receive the care needed.

Cost & Eligibility

Certain requirements must be met in order to qualify for continuous care.  The hospice payment on a continuous care day varies depending on the number of hours of continuous services provided.

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Hospice In The Home

Sometimes referred to as “Routine” hospice care.  Most hospice patients are served in their own homes.  Home hospice services are designed to ease pain, alleviate symptoms and provide support to the patients and their caregivers.  The team of hospice workers to include nurses, aides, social workers, chaplains, medical director, and volunteers work with the patient and caregivers to determine how often a patient needs to be seen in his/her home to maximize hospice benefits.

Cost & Eligibility

Medicare and most private insurance plans cover home hospice services with little or no co-pays.  Also included in home hospice services are medical equipment such as hospital beds, bedside commodes, oxygen, and other needed equipment.  Medications related to the terminal illness are also most often covered under most plans.

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Hospice Respite Care

Respite care is care given to a hospice patient by another caregiver so that the usual caregiver can rest. As a hospice patient, you may have one person that takes care of you every day. That person might be a family member. Sometimes they need someone to take care of you for a short time while they do other things that need to be done. During a period of respite care, you will be cared for in a Medicare-approved facility, such as a hospice facility, hospital or nursing home

Cost & Eligibility

You may be required to pay up to 5% of the Medicare payment amount for inpatient respite care: For example, if Medicare pays $100 per day for inpatient respite care, you will pay $5 per day. You can stay in a Medicare-approved hospital or nursing home up to 5 days each time you get respite care. There is no limit to the number of times you can get respite care. The amount you pay for respite care can change each year.

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General Inpatient Care

General Inpatient Care (GIP) is a level of care in a hospice unit of a hospital or in a residential hospice house which is designed for critical patients with short-term hospice needs which may not be met at home.  Sometimes uncontrolled symptoms may require this special level of care and are usually temporary.

Cost & Eligibility

GIP hospice care is available for patients who are determined to be at a level of severity whereby routine care in the home cannot meet the patient’s needs.  Certain conditions must be met in order to qualify for this level of care.  Typically, there is no additional cost to the patient with Medicare as well as with many private insurance plans.

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Hospice in a Hospice House

Residential Hospice House is a specialized residence which allows the capability of all levels of Hospice Care in one setting.   It provides full time medical care that family members may be unable to offer.  It also provides an experienced multidisciplinary staff of doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains, bereavement specialists, and volunteers all located on-site.

Cost & Eligibility

Although Medicare will cover routine hospice services, it doesn’t cover room and board if you get hospice care in a nursing home or a hospice residential house. However, if the hospice medical team determines that you need short-term inpatient or respite care services that they arrange, your stay in the facility is covered. You may have to pay a small copayment for the respite stay.  Many private insurance plans follow similar guidelines.  It is important to know that residential hospice houses are expensive to run and that most of them have to charge nominal room and board fees in order to provide quality hospice services.  Many times they will work with patients on a sliding scale fee rate or they may also have funds from donations set aside to pay these fees for certain patients who qualify.

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